Winter is here and the seasons for the dives are all changing. Great Whites are in peak season now and the Sardine Run is soon to start!

Gansbaai

Gansbaai

Winter has hit us with a bang in the last couple of weeks. We had a very gentle start but the last two weeks has seen cold front after cold front hitting us. We have had severe hail and also snow on the mountain tops. Normally this severe weather comes at the end of winter so let’s hope it starts to improve. In between the bad weather, however, we have been at the Island and at Shark Alley and the sharks have been in great form. Being back at the Island is excellent as the visibility is much better! There are still a couple of boats at the beach and they are having good shark activity but low underwater visibility. Check out our Shark Cage Diving trips and packages.

The whales have also started to move in for the winter and the remainder of these gentle giants should arrive towards the end of June. In peak time around September – December, there are over 200 whales in the bay calving, mating and nurturing their young. I am so excited about this winter season – by the end of the month we will be running our Big 2 Combo packages until December.

We have finished renovating our new self-catering house at the back of the Roundhouse. The place looks amazing and you can have a look at the new house called Albatross House.  By summertime (October) we will have our pool up and running and our chill out deck in the garden.

Cape Town

Cape Town diving trips

With the onset of winter the breaching season has started at Seal Island. We are seeing an average of four breaches on our decoy and also several predations on seals per trip. With the bad weather we are lucky to be protected by the Cape Peninsular, and although choppy, we can get you out on the water nearly every day. Check out our Cape Town diving trips.

The Blue & Mako season has come to an end now and unless there is a group of you that insist on going we will not be venturing out into the blue until October. The season has been a great one as normal with multiple sharks on every trip and good visibility. We have had a little more wind than normal this year so could not get out as much as we wanted to but it has been another excellent season.

The seal diving season has also come to a close. Duiker Island is on the Atlantic side of the peninsular so is exposed to the winter weather and swells and it is very difficult to schedule trips as the weather can come in quickly. They don’t call this the Cape of Storms for nothing!

We are still seeing Seven Gill Cow Sharks and this dive site is protected from the winter storms so whilst they are around we can dive this awesome site.

Mossel Bay

Mossel Bay shark cage diving trips

The winter season has started and the boat is back at the Island. This is very close to the harbour and it is quick to get to. The shark activity is great in the mornings with good visibility (4-5m) and feisty sharks. Mossel Bay is protected from the winter storms so if you are travelling up the east coast this is a great option if your shark dives have been blown out in Cape Town and Gansbaai.  Please don’t hesitate to contact us for more information on Mossel Bay shark cage diving trips.

Durban

Shark Week Durban

With the winter arriving the water has cooled; the Tiger Sharks have become more scarce and the Ragged Tooth Sharks have moved in. Diving is excellent as there are many Ragged Tooth Sharks around and we will always see the Black Tip Sharks, and, at this time of year, Dusky sharks. Our Shark Week Durban packages have now been suspended until the end of the Sardine Run.

The Shark Cage Diving has been going well as always with guaranteed sharks daily and happy faces. This trip is for anyone who can swim and a great way to introduce yourself to shark diving if you are a non-diver.  We will be running dives and shark cage dives throughout June & July during the Sardine Run so if you are interested we are ready for you.

Sardine Run

The Sardine Run

The Sardine Run has started down the coast in East London. The sardines move up the east coast from the Agulhas Bank to Durban and there were a couple of boats out at East London this year to try to catch the early stages of the Sardine Run. Bait balls were spotted but unfortunately the visibility was not good enough to enter the water (safety first). You do not want to jump into pea soup surrounded by sharks. Within the next two weeks the Sardine Run will be in full swing up the coast at Port St Johns where the continental shelf runs only two kilometres from the coastline. The sardines will then be very close to shore and the action is furious with predators such as sharks, dolphins, whales and tuna chasing the sardines to the surface. The sardines form tight balls for safety and we will be looking for signs of activity by watching the gannets. We will travel up and down the coastline looking out for tight groups of gannets dive bombing into the ocean then it is a full throttle dash to the action to jump into the middle of the feeding frenzy.  Time is running out to book so you had better contact us immediately if you want to join the action!

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